Category Archive: Climate

Women In Agriculture, North West Plains Sustainability Group To Form New Garden Club During Extreme Drought

In a region greatly affected by the worst drought in living memory, we were united in seeing gardening as a great way to alleviate anxiety and bring the community together. We had planned for 50 – 80 to attend, but 140 registered. An indication of how valuable our gardens are and how practical regional gatherings like this can be for our mental and spiritual health and our sense of community.

Bellis Open Day, Mother’s Day Weekend, 11-12th May 2019

Feeling disempowered by climate change? Discover the power of small, meaningful changes as demonstrated at Bellis. Founded in 2003, the annual Open Day at Bellis garden in subtropical Brisbane will be on Mother’s Day Weekend, 11-12th May 2019. Be inspired to help climate repair and reinvigorated to grow a better future.

Use Grey Water For Gardening? Then Use Green Cleaners For Cleaning.

If you’re watering plants with grey water, the type of detergent you use really makes a difference to both their health and the health of the soil.

Which Trees To Plant At Inverell, NSW, To Cope With Predicted Climate Change?

How do you approach tree planting? “All life on Earth is now experimental. Thanks to a lack of Australian climate leadership, we grow crops and plant gardens in uncharted climate territory. If this is the future of gardening, then we must embrace experimental tree planting for shade, food, fodder and biodiversity”. Jerry Coleby-Williams, Founder of Bellis, Brisbane’s award-winning, affordable sustainable house and garden; Director, Seed Saver’s Network; Patron, National Toxics Network; Patron, Householder’s Options for Protecting the Environment, 2nd February 2019.

Tomatillo Salsa Verde Recipe

“Salsa verde, chilled and freshly made from home grown tomatillos (Physalis philadelphica), is great on a hot day. An excuse for not cooking on (another) one of those sticky subtropical summer days”.

‘Putting sustainable food production into context’; Jerry Coleby-Williams, Patron, National Toxics Network Inc.

We ignore the following key aspects of sustainable food production at our peril:
* A culture of forgetting – we forget our horticultural history;
* Declining crop diversity, both in the range of species grown and in the genetic diversity within each crop;
* The oversimplification and impoverishment of systems of food production;
* A reluctance to apply the precautionary principle where using the least toxic solution in crop protection comes first;

A Taste of Vietnam in my Garden
/ Hương vị Việt Nam trong vườn nhà tôi

I’m waiting for the summer wet season to start. Until the rain arrives, there is little cloud to filter the hot sunlight.

 Thank goodness for old net curtains and shadecloth! 

I thought I would… Continue reading

Oil, Rust and Global Crises. Ten Years On…

Ten years ago British Petroleum closed Prudhoe Bay, the largest oilfield in the USA. Rusted, leaking oil pipes heavily polluted a region already suffering from accelerating global warming. At the same time, melting… Continue reading

Bellis Open Day, Mother’s Day Weekend, 13 – 14th May 2016

MEDIA RELEASE: This is your opportunity to visit the amazing and affordable sustainable garden of well-known Gardening Australia presenter, Jerry Coleby-Williams. Get a first-hand look at what can be achieved on a suburban block… Continue reading

Footpath Gardening: To Boldly Garden Where No One Has Gardened Before…

Nature strip gardening can beautify streets capes, improving the retail sale prices of real estate. Reseach has proven nature strips provide valuable social and environmental services.

Public safety is vital. Plants in nature strips should not be spiny, caustic, toxic or allowed to overgrow, or cause trip hazards, impede wheelchairs, or block lines of sight. The effect should not be overgrown, full of litter or claustrophobic, it should be park-like.

Spring Follows Winter. But Can You Set Your Calendar By That?

“This gardener wonders if the Carnival of Flowers date will alter in order to keep up with changing climate?

In Production Today: Subtropical Spring

“Over the spring to autumn growing season I hope to demonstrate which species – either Comfrey or Queensland Arrowroot – uses the least amount of water to grow successfully, and which produces the greatest amount of organic matter”.

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